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Spring in Shakespeare’s Country

Shakespeare's house in Stratford upon Avon by David Prutchi PhD www.prutchi.com

I had some business meetings in England this week, and on my way back to Birmingham Airport I stopped in Stratford-Upon-Avon to see the houses where Shakespeare was born and died.  Warwick Castle was also along the way, so I stopped briefly to take a few pictures before sunset. Read more…

 
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Abigail’s Whimsical Sand Pendulum

Abigail Prutchi's Sand Pendulum www.prutchi.com

On a recent trip to Israel, Abigail (10) saw a very pretty, large, and expensive sand pendulum.  In it, the pendulum was able to swing, while at the same time, the sand pan was able to rotate freely.  We applied our motto “Why buy it if we can MAKE it!”.

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Maggi “Cook Studio” in Leipzig: Delicious Home-Cooked Meals from Ready-Made Packages – A Culinary Oxymoron?

Maggi restaurant in Leipzig, Germany. David Prutchi PhD, www.prutchi.com

Growing up in Ecuador, Maggi Sauce was always available at our table, and Maggi bouillon cubes were part of many of our cook’s recipes.  On the odd Sunday that we didn’t have lunch out, my mom would prepare a Maggi soup (usually cream of mushroom or asparagus, being my father’s and my favorite), and there was always creamy onion dip prepared from an envelope of Maggi onion soup when we had guests.  As such, Maggi soups do bring me fond memories, but I never thought someone would like them SO much as to go to a restaurant to eat freshly reconstituted soups and casseroles from a Maggi envelope… Read more…

 
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A Lesson in State Paranoia: The Stasi Museum in Leipzig, Germany

The Stasi Museum in Leipzig, Germany.  (c)2012 David Prutchi, PhD  www.prutchi.com

2 Weeks ago I visited one of our patients in Germany.  The hospital was close to Leipzig, and I had a few hours to stroll through town.  I went to the Museum in der Runde Ecke, which documents the power and banality of the  former district headquarters of the East German State Security Service or “Stasi” in Leipzig, Germany.  The exhibits are only labeled in German, but an excellent audioguide was available for 4 Euros. Read more…

 
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d.i.y. Combined L-Band (23 cm) Helical Feed and Ku 0.4 dB LNBF for 120 cm Dish

Helical feed for L-Band dish for amateur space communications. N2QG David Prutchi PhD www.prutchi.com www.diyPhysics.com

The high-gain antenna on my space communications array is based on a Fortec Star 120 cm dish.  This is a high-quality, large dish designed for motorized FTA reception of analog, digital, and high-definition programs on Ku band satellites.  I built a feed that combines a KU band horn for free-to-air (FTA) satellite reception with a helical feed for transmission and reception in the amateur L-band (23 cm, 1,296 MHz).

Being a peace-loving atheist, I am not interested in the religious and radicalized political junk that is most prominent over FTA.  Instead, I use the Ku-band transmissions from geosynchronous FTA satellites as known-Az/El beacons to calibrate the aim of my array.

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d.i.y. Gyroscopic Camera Stabilizer that Really Works!

One of my current work-related projects required me to buy some gyroscopes for prototyping.  I purchased some of the beautiful, motor-driven demonstration gyros made by Glenn Turner at www.gyroscope.com.

Also as part of the project, I came across the professional-grade (and professionally priced, starting at $1,600) gyroscopic camera stabilizers made by Kenyon Laboratories.  These devices don’t seem to have changed much since Kenyon’s founder filed the following two patents in the 50′s:  US2811042, US2570130. Read more…

 
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New Radiation-Detection-Related Posts at www.diyPhysics.com

I just published three scintillation-probe related posts at www.diyPhysics.com.

Low pass filter to use commercial pulse processor with PRA David Prutchi PhD www.prutchi.comFirst is on the construction of a very simple low-pass filter to interface commercial PMT amplifiers/scintillation processors to the PRA (“Pulse Recorder and Analyser”) software MCA: Read more…

 
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Posted to diyPhysics.com: d.i.y. GPS-Disciplined 10 MHz Standard + UTC Clock

diy GPS-disciplined 10 Mhz frequency standard and atomic universal time clock by David Prutchi PhD

Last week I posted detailed construction information for my rubidium atomic clock frequency reference.  Besides that unit, I also built a GPS-disciplined 10 MHz oscillator to serve as a secondary frequency reference, as well as a source of GPS NMEA data for my ham shack instruments that can use precise location and real-time-clock data (e.g. for satellite tracking).  I just posted on www.diyPhysics.com details about this 10 MHz GPS-disciplined standard. Read more…

 
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Posted to diyPhysics.com: d.i.y. 10 MHz Atomic Clock Frequency Standard Using Surplus Rubidium Oscillator

d.i.y. Rubidium atomic clock 10 MHz reference by David Prutchi PhD www.diyPhysics.comI just posted on www.diyPhysics.com  about my 10 MHz rubidium standard based on a surplus Efratom M-100.  It is a free-standing 10 MHz +/-5×10-11 frequency standard for frequency counters, as well as a precise calibration source. I use it to keep precise track of frequency when working on Earth-Moon-Earth (EME) communications, where even tiny errors in tuning can make the difference between success and failure to receive weak echoes. Read more…

 
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SharkVision – A Sensing Suit for the Blind by Hannah Prutchi

SharkVision obstacle detector for the blind by Hannah Prutchi www.prutchi.comSharkVision – A Sensing Suit for the Blind

Hannah Prutchi, 8th Grade, Science, VMS, October 2011

Blind people often use canes to avoid obstacles when walking. But, these are intrusive, can only detect obstacles where they are pointed, and could be dangerous to other people.  I devised the “SharkVision Suit” to help blind people move around their environment more easily.

I developed this idea from the concept that sharks find their prey by sensing disturbances in an electrical field they form around their bodies. This suit simulates the shark’s ability to sense objects around its body, giving a blind person a new type of sense. Read more…

 
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